Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani

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Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani
File:ISN 195.jpg
Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani's identity portrait, showing him wearing the white uniform issued to white uniform individuals.
Born February 27, 1975 (1975-02-27) (age 47)
Riyahd, Saudi Arabia
Nationality Saudi Arabia
Occupation charity worker

Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani (born February 1, 1975 in Riyadh) is a citizen of Saudi Arabia currently held in the United States Guantanamo Bay Naval Base, in Cuba.[1] His Guantanamo Internment Serial Number is 195.

A relief worker living in Afghanistan, al-Shumrani was arrested in 2001.[2]

Al-Shumrani was transferred to Guantanamo on January 17, 2002.[3][4] As of August 2015 he remains held in Guantanamo as one of the "forever prisoners", individuals considered too innocent to face charges, but too dangerous to be released.

On August 7, 2015, Carol Rosenberg, writing in the Miami Herald, reported that documents presented to his 2015 Periodic Review Board panel, his following the news on ISIS was offered as a justification for his continued detention.[5]

Scholars at the Brookings Institute, lead by Benjamin Wittes, listed the captives still held in Guantanamo in December 2008, according to whether their detention was justified by certain common allegations[6]:

  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... are associated with both Al Qaeda and the Taliban."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... traveled to Afghanistan for jihad."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges that the following detainees stayed in Al Qaeda, Taliban or other guest- or safehouses."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... took military or terrorist training in Afghanistan."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... fought for the Taliban."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges ... were at Tora Bora."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives whose "names or aliases were found on material seized in raids on Al Qaeda safehouses and facilities."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who "The military alleges that the following detainees were captured under circumstances that strongly suggest belligerency."[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the captives who was an "al Qaeda operative".[6]
  • Mohammad Al Rahman Al Shumrani was listed as one of the "82 detainees made no statement to CSRT or ARB tribunals or made statements that do not bear materially on the military’s allegations against them."[6]


References

  1. OARDEC. "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006" (PDF). United States Department of Defense. Archived from the original on 2007-09-30. http://www.dod.mil/news/May2006/d20060515%20List.pdf. Retrieved 2006-05-15. 
  2. Frank Joordans (2009-01-22). "World leaders welcome Gitmo closure". Toronto Star. Archived from the original on 2015-08-07. https://web.archive.org/web/20150807232804/http://www.thestar.com/news/world/2009/01/22/world_leaders_welcome_gitmo_closure.html. ""We were overjoyed when we heard the news," said Ali al-Shamrani, who is from the Saudi capital, Riyadh. He said his nephew Mohammed al-Shamrani, 35, has been held at Guantanamo for eight years after being picked up in Afghanistan, where he was doing relief work." 
  3. "Measurements of Heights and Weights of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (ordered and consolidated version)". Center for the Study of Human Rights in the Americas, from DoD data. Archived from the original on 2009-12-21. http://humanrights.ucdavis.edu/resources/library/documents-and-reports/gtmo_heightsweights.pdf. Retrieved 2009-12-21. 
  4. Margot Williams (2008-11-03). "Guantanamo Docket: Mohammad al Rahman al Shumrani". New York Times. http://projects.nytimes.com/guantanamo/detainees/195-mohammad-al-rahman-al-shumrani. Retrieved 2015-08-07. 
  5. Carol Rosenberg (2015-08-07). "Guantánamo now tracking captives’ interest in ISIS, founded after prison". Miami Herald. Archived from the original on 2015-08-07. https://web.archive.org/web/20150807223118/http://www.miamiherald.com/news/nation-world/world/americas/guantanamo/article30386181.html. "The captive, Muhammed abd al Rahman al Shumrani, 40, one of Guantánamo’s 32 “forever prisoners” who have been considered too dangerous to release but ineligible for a criminal trial, was asking to go home. His American lawyer of nine years said in a statement to the board that he wants to “focus on his family and building a peaceful life.”" 
  6. 6.00 6.01 6.02 6.03 6.04 6.05 6.06 6.07 6.08 6.09 6.10 Benjamin Wittes, Zaathira Wyne (2008-12-16). "The Current Detainee Population of Guantánamo: An Empirical Study". The Brookings Institute. Archived from the original on 2012-06-22. http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/reports/2008/12/16%20detainees%20wittes/1216_detainees_wittes.pdf. Retrieved 2010-02-16.