Mikhail Chigorin club

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Mikhail Chigorin's club is a symbolic club uniting chess players from all over the world who have won at least one game with classical time control in the official competition against the world champion at the time of holding this title[1]. The results of consulting, thematic and training tournaments are not taken into account. A chess player who once won the title of world champion according to the classical version, withdraws from the club. The club was created on the initiative of Vitaly Gnirenko[2][3][4], a chess player from Rostov-on-Don and named after the Russian chess player Mikhail Chigorin (1850-1908), who on January 20, 1889 was the first to defeat the world chess champion Wilhelm Steinitz and beat him in 13 games, but he never managed to become the world champion. For the first time, an article describing the principle of selection to the club and an extract from the chronological register of club members was published in the magazine "64 - Chess Review", № 1, 2012. As of July 31, 2018, there were 16 world champions in the history of chess in the classical version. The first was Wilhelm Steinitz, and on November 22, 2013, Magnus Carlsen became the sixteenth. Only the victory over a classic world champion allows to become a member of the Mikhail Chigorin club. Victories over other versions of world championships do not count for membership in the club.

History

It is prestigious for any chess player to win the world champion at the official competition with classical control. This goal has not been achieved by many outstanding grandmasters of the past, such as Rudolf Spielmann, Aron Nimzowitsch, Géza Maróczy, Salo Flohr, Leonid Stein and Lev Polugaevsky. Alexander Khalifman(1999-2000) and Rustam Kasimdzhanov (2004-2005) never won a classical world chess champion according to the FIDE system. Among the modern chess players who are among the top ten in Elo rating, as of July 31, 2018, Ding Liren and Anish Giri have not yet won such victories. No woman chess player, including Vera Menchik and Judith Polgar, who have excellent results in men's competitions, have such an achievement. At the same time, many chess players who have won sensational victories over the world championships are forgotten. The main purpose of creating the club of Mikhail Chigorin is to preserve the names of all those who have won at least once the reigning world champion in the history of chess. The first mention of the club in the press was given in the republican newspaper "Turkmen spark" dated June 3, 1995. The published article was written on the basis of a letter from Vitaly Gnirenko to local master Anatoly Kudryashov, who had defeated the world champion Tigran Petrosyan in 1967. In January 2017, the first issue of the chess bulletin "Mikhail Chigorin's Club" was published in Rostov-on-Don. The material of the bulletin in A4 format is available in Russian and English.[5] As of July 31, 2018, there were 110 chess players at the Mikhail Chigorin Club, since the establishment of the title "World Chess Champion" in 1886. 14 world champions lost membership in the club. Wilhelm Steinitz and Anatoly Karpov were never the members of the club.

Major records

Mikhail Chigorin is the most successful in terms of the number of victories over the world championships. He has 15 victories. He beat Wilhelm Steinitz 14 times and he beat Emanuel Lasker once. A unique member of the club is the FIDE world champion from Bulgaria, grandmaster Veselin Topalov (2005-2006), who has beaten four world champions in the classical version: twice Garry Kasparov, four times Vladimir Kramnik, three times Viswanathan Anand and twice Magnus Carlsen. The career of the strongest English chess player of the end of the 19th century Joseph Blackburne (1841-1924) is distinguished by examples of sports longevity. At the age of 53, he defeated world champion Emanuel Lasker for the first time at a tournament in Hastings (1895) and again four years later at a tournament in London (1899). The American grandmaster Gata Kamsky (born 1974) became the youngest member of the club in 1992 at a tournament in Dortmund, beating world champion Garry Kasparov before reaching the age of 18. The shortest game was won by Grandmaster Vladimir Liberzon (1937-1996), the world champion, in 1964. Tigran Petrosyan resigned on the 15th move.

Club membership

World Champion Winner Year and venue of the competition Defeated world champion
1. Mikhail Chigorin 1889. Havana Wilhelm Steinitz
2. Isidor Gunsberg 1890. New York
3. Kurt von Bardeleben 1895. Hastings Emanuel Lasker
4. Siegbert Tarrasch 1895. Hastings
5. Joseph Blackburne 1895. Hastings
6. Harry Pillsbury 1895 / 96. St. Petersburg[6]
7.David Janowski 1896. Nuremberg
8.Rudolf Charousek 1896
9.Frank James Marshall 1900
10.Carl Schlechter 1904. Cambridge Springs
11.Akiba Rubinstein 1909. St. Petersburg
12. Fyodor Duz-Khotimirsky 1909. St. Petersburg
13. Osip Bernstein 1914. St. Petersburg
14. Richard Reti 1924 José Raúl Capablanca
15. Alexander Ilyin-Genevsky 1925. Moscow
16. Boris Verlinsky 1925
17. Efim Bogolyubov 1929. Wiesbaden Alexander Alekhine
18. Herman Mattison 1931. Prague
19. Oscar Negeli 1932. Bern[7]
20. Arthur Dake 1932. Pasadena
21. Savielly Tartakower 1933. Folkestone
22. Petrus van Horn 1937. Leiden. Max Euwe
23. Andre Lilienthal 1937. Stockholm
24. Thorsten Gauffin 1937. Stockholm
25. Vladimir Petrov 1938. Margit Alexander Alekhine
26. Reubin Fine 1938. Amsterdam
27. Karel Opochensky 1941. Munich
28. Bjorn Nielsen 1941. Munich
29. Klaus Junge 1942 Salzburg
30.Ludwig Rellstab 1942. Munich[8]
31. Arturo Bone 1945. Gijon[9]
32. Antonio Medina 1945. Gijon[10]
33. Lopez Nunez 1945. Almeria[11]
34. Francisco Lupi 1946. Estoril
35. Paul Keres 1948. Moscow Mikhail Botvinnik
36. David Bronstein 1951
37. Nikolay Kopilov 1951. Moscow
38. Efim Geller 1951. Moscow
39. Jozsef Szily 1952. Budapest[12]
40. Mark Taimanov 1952. Moscow
41. Samuel Reshevsky 1955. Moscow[13]
42. Miroslav Filip 1957. Baden Vasily Smyslov
43. Andreas Duckstein 1958. Munich Mikhail Botvinnik
44. Jonathan Penrose 1960. Leipzig Mikhail Tal
45. Wolfgang Unzicker 1961. Oberhausen Mikhail Botvinnik
46. Wolfgang Ullmann 1962. Varna
47. Svetozar Gligoric 1963. Los Angeles Tigran Petrosyan
48. Viktor Korchnoi 1963. Moscow
49. Vladimir Liberzon 1964
50. Lajos Portisch 1965. Zagreb[14]
51. Bent Larsen 1966. Santa Monica
52. Anatoly Kudriashov 1967. Moscow
53. Borislav Ivkov 1968. Palma de Mallorca
54. Ulf Andersson 1975. Milan[15] Anatoly Karpov
55. Eugenio Torre 1976. Manila[16]
56. Alexander Belyavsky 1977. Leningrad[17]
57. Jan Timman 1978 [18]
58. Igor Ivanov 1979.Moscow
59. Anthony Miles 1980. Skara
60. Yuri Balashov 1980. Rostov-on-Don[19]
61. Zoltan Ribli 1980. Amsterdam[20].
62. Fridrik Olafsson 1980. Buenos Aires[21]
63. Vlastimil Hort 1981. Amsterdam[22]
64. Palermo Garcia 1982. Mar del Plata[23]
65. Yasser Seirawan 1982. London[24]
66. Lubomir Ljubojevic 1982. Turin[25]
67. Zurab Azmaiparashvili 1983. Moscow
68. Wolfram Hartmann 1983. Hannover[26]
69. Nigel Short 1986. Brussels Garry Kasparov
70. Andrei Sokolov 1988. Reykjavik [27]
71. Artur Yusupov 1989. Barcelona[28]
72. Boris Gulko 1990. Linares
73. Vasily Ivanchuk 1991. Linares
74. Gata Kamsky 1992. Dortmund[29]
75. Robert Hubner 1992. Dortmund
76. Joel Lautier 1994. Linares
77. Alexander Schneider 1994. Lyon[30]
78. Veselin Topalov 1994. Moscow
79. Jereon Piket 1995. Amsterdam[31]
80. Peter Svidler 1997. Tilburg
81. Ivan Sokolov 1999. Wijk aan Zee
82. Alexander Morozevich 2001. Wijk aan Zee Vladimir Kramnik
83. Ruslan Ponomariov 2003. Wijk aan Zee
84. Alexei Shirov 2003. Wijk aan Zee
85. Loek Van Wely 2003. Wijk aan Zee
86. Vladimir Hakobyan 2004. Wijk aan Zee
87. Michael Adams 2004. Wijk aan Zee
88. Peter Leko 2004. Brissago
89. Emil Sutovsky 2005. Dortmund[32]
90. Etienne Bacrot 2005. Dortmund
91. Evgeny Bareev 2005. Moscow
92. Teymur Rajabov 2008. Wijk aan Zee Viswanathan Anand
93. Levon Aronian 2008. Morelia
94. Hikaru Nakamura 2011. London[33]
95. Sergei Tiviakov 2012. Baden Baden[34]
96. Boris Gelfand 2012. Moscow
97. Wang Hao 2013. Wijk aan Zee
98. Fabiano Caruana 2013. Zurich[35]
99. Arkadij Naiditsch 2014. Tromsø Magnus Carlsen
100. Ivan Šarić 2014. Tromsø
101. Radoslaw Wojtaszek 2015. Wijk aan Zee
102. Jon Hammer 2015. Stavanger[36]
103. Alexander Grischuk 2015. St. Louis[37]
104. Yannick Pelletier 2015. Reykjavik[38]
105. Sergey Karjakin 2016. New York[39]
106. Richárd Rapport 2017. Wijk aan Zee
107. Maxime Vachier-Lagrave 2017. St. Louis[40]
108. Bu Xiangzhi 2017. Tbilisi[41].
109. Ian Nepomniachtchi 2017. London[42]
110. Wesley So 2018. Stavanger[43]
111. Shakhriyar Mamedyarov 2018. Bil[44]


Sources

  • Painters, B' Ashgabatec is a member of the World Chess Champions Club. "Turkmenskaya spark", June 3, 1995.
  • "Gnirenko, V."" Records of two symbolic clubs/// "Chess time" magazine Omsk, 25 February 1998.
  • Gnirenko, V. Two symbolic clubs. All-Russian Chess Week newspaper No. 21 (52), May 2003.
  • "Gnirenko, V." Records of two symbolic clubs //64 - Chess Review. 2012. № 1. С. 82—84.
  • Gnirenko, V. 100th member of Mikhail Chigorin’s club//50 Moves Magazine.-2014.-October.-p. 24-25.
  • Wall, B. Mikhail Chigorin Club.-2014.-October.
  • Gnirenko, V. A Year in the Life//New in Chess.-2015.-No.2.-p. 11-15.-ISBN 978-90-5691-578.
  • Gnirenko, V. En eksklusiv klubb//Norst Sjakkblad.-2015.-No.3.-p. 52-53.
  • "Mallard, D. How to beat the world champion? - 10.11.2015
  • Chigorin Club replenishment 18.11.2015
  • "Gnirenko, V." Two years on the chess throne (to the 25th anniversary of Magnus Carlsen)// 64 - Chess Review. 2015. № 11. С. 84—90.
  • Ilyumzhinov, K. In memory of Mark Taimanov. - — 28.11.2016
  • Gnirenko, V. From Mikhail Chigorin to Jan Nepomniashchy // 64 - Chess Review. 2018. № 2. С. 90—91.
  • Mikhail Chigorin's Club Website: https://chigorinsclub.wordpress.com


References

  1. 64 — Chess Review. 2012. № 1. pp. 82.
  2. "Chess.com: Mikhail Chigorin Club"
  3. "About the club"
  4. "Mikhail Chigorin Club"
  5. "Клуб Михаила Чигорина на полях Вейк-ан-Зее". Russian Chess Federation. http://ruchess.ru/blogs/dimakrya/klub-mikhaila-chigorina-na-polyakh-veykanzee/. Retrieved 2017-06-09. 
  6. St. Petersburg 1895-96
  7. "Mikhail Chigorin Club"
  8. ChessGames.com
  9. Chessgames.com
  10. Antonio Angel Medina Garcia vs Alexander Alekhine (1945)
  11. Alexander Alekhine vs Lopez Nunez (1945)
  12. Chessgames.com
  13. Samuel Reshevsky vs Mikhail Botvinnik (1955) "Cold War"
  14. Tigran Vartanovich Petrosian vs Lajos Portisch (1965)
  15. Chessgames.com
  16. Chessgames.com
  17. Chessgames.com
  18. Chessgames.com
  19. OlimpBase :: 11th Soviet Team Chess Cup, Rostov-on-Don 1980, information
  20. Chessgames.com
  21. Chessgames.com
  22. Chessgames.com
  23. Chessgames.com
  24. Phillips & Drew Kings (1982)
  25. Chessgames.com
  26. Anatoly Karpov vs Wolfram Hartmann (1983)
  27. Reykjavik World Cup 1988
  28. Barcelona World Cup 1989
  29. Dortmund 1992
  30. View Game
  31. Chessgames.com
  32. Chessgames.com
  33. Chessgames.com
  34. Baden Baden wins the Bundesliga; Tiviakov beats Anand | Chess News
  35. ChessPro. Zurich Chess Challenge 2013. All about the tournament
  36. ChessPro. Norway Chess. Stavanger 2015. All about the tournament
  37. ChessPro. Sinquefield Cup. St. Louis, USA 2015. All about the tournament
  38. ChessPro. European Team Championships, 5th round
  39. ChessPro. World Championship Match, Round 8
  40. | www.chesspro.ru
  41. | www.chesspro.ru
  42. Carlsen vs Nepomniachtchi Chessgames.com
  43. Broadcast | www.chesspro.ru
  44. Mamedyarov on beating Carlsen in Biel // Chess24.com



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