Difference between revisions of "Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training"

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The '''Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training''' is an administrative body of the [[State of Minnesota]], that sets regulations, and controls the training and licensing of Police officers.<ref name=startribune2020-06-17/>   
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The '''Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training''' (POST) is an administrative body of the [[State of Minnesota]], that sets regulations, and controls the training and licensing of Police officers.<ref name=startribune2020-06-17A/>  The Minnesota legislature replaced the [[Minnesota Peace Officer Training Board]] (MPOTB) with the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) in 1977.<ref name=AboutPOST/>
  
Although the four officers were prompty fired, and soon faced criminal charges, they continued to hold licenses to work as police officers.<ref name=startribune2020-06-17/>  According to the ''[[Star Tribune]]'' the [[Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training]] (POST) did not start a review of their licenses to work as police officers until June 17, 2020.
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Colleges and Universities that offer training for Police officers must be certified by the Board.<ref name=AboutPOST/>  The Board is responsible for the exams candidates must pass before they can serve as Police officers in Minnesota.<ref name=kbjr2020-06-25/>  More than 80 percent of Minnesota's Police officers receive their training through one of colleges or universities in the [[Minnesota State]] system.<ref name=startribune2020-06-17B/>
  
<ref name=jeffbackerjr/>
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The May 25, 2020, [[Killing of George Floyd]], by officers of the [[Minneapolis Police Department]], triggered discussion on how to update police training.<ref name=kbjr2020-06-25/><ref name=startribune2020-06-17B/><ref name=twincities2020-06-17/><ref name=minnpost2020-06-02/><ref name=minnpost2020-06-25/>
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[[Derek Chauvin]], [[Tou Thao]], [[Thomas K. Lane]] and XXX, the four officers with a role in Floyd's killing, were prompty fired, and soon faced criminal charges.  They continued to hold licenses to work as police officers.<ref name=startribune2020-06-17A/>  According to the ''[[Star Tribune]]'' the [[Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training]] (POST) started a review of their licenses to work as police officers until June 17, 2020.
  
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
{{Reflist|refs=  
 
{{Reflist|refs=  
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{{cite news     
 
{{cite news     
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</ref>
 
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<ref name=minnpost2020-06-02>
 
{{cite news     
 
{{cite news     
| url        =  
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| url        = https://www.minnpost.com/community-voices/2020/06/break-the-cycle-fives-changes-in-minnesota-policing-that-can-be-enacted-right-now/
| title      =  
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| title      = Break the cycle: Five changes in Minnesota policing that can be enacted right now
| work        =  
+
| work        = [[Minnesota Post]]
| author      =  
+
| author1    = Gina Erickson
| date        =  
+
| author2    = Sarah Greenman
| page        =  
+
| author3    = Jillian Peterson
| location    =  
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| author4    = Shelly Schaefer
| isbn       =  
+
| date       = 2020-06-02
| language    =
+
| trans-title =
+
 
| archiveurl  =  
 
| archiveurl  =  
 
| archivedate =  
 
| archivedate =  
 
| accessdate  = 2020-06-29
 
| accessdate  = 2020-06-29
 
| url-status  = live       
 
| url-status  = live       
| quote      =  
+
| quote      = Officer Chauvin’s previous use of force incidents should have been reviewed by a board that includes citizens, separate from criminal and administrative investigations. This is being done in other cities, to increase transparency and accountability. Domestic Fatality Review teams can be used as a model.
 
}}
 
}}
 
</ref>
 
</ref>
  
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<ref name=minnpost2020-06-25>
 
{{cite news     
 
{{cite news     
| url        =  
+
| url        = https://www.minnpost.com/glean/2020/06/minnesota-ag-ellison-sues-oil-companies-over-climate-change/
| title      =  
+
| title      = Minnesota AG Ellison sues oil companies over climate change
 +
| work        = [[Minnesota Post]]
 +
| author      = Brian Lambert
 +
| date        = 2020-06-25
 +
| archiveurl  =
 +
| archivedate =
 +
| accessdate  = 2020-06-29
 +
| url-status  = live
 +
| quote      = Erik Misselt, the interim director of the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training, said the POST board’s policies haven’t kept up with the public’s expectations for police accountability. … Misselt said he’d like to see the POST board go to the state Legislature and ask for changes in state laws to broaden its authority.
 +
}}
 +
</ref>
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 +
{{cite news   
 +
| url        = https://www.startribune.com/minnesota-state-colleges-to-review-law-enforcement-training-after-floyd-s-killing/571319522/?refresh=true
 +
| title      = Hamline professors: If they want to improve policing in Minnesota, legislators need to know this
 +
By SHELLY SCHAEFER, JILLIAN PETERSON, SARAH GREENMAN, AND GINA ERICKSON |
 
| work        =  
 
| work        =  
 
| author      =  
 
| author      =  
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</ref>
 
</ref>
  
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<ref name=AboutPOST>
 
{{cite news     
 
{{cite news     
| url        =  
+
| url        = https://dps.mn.gov/entity/post/about/Pages/default.aspx
| title      =  
+
| title      = About the POST Board
| work        =  
+
| work        = [[Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training]]
 
| author      =  
 
| author      =  
 
| date        =  
 
| date        =  
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</ref>
 
</ref>
  
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<ref name=kbjr2020-06-25>
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{{cite news   
 +
| url        = https://kbjr6.com/2020/06/25/mn-state-to-review-law-enforcement-training-programs/
 +
| title      = MN State to review law enforcement training programs
 +
| work        = [[kbjr6]]
 +
| author      = Emma Quinn
 +
| date        = 2020-06-25
 +
| location    = [[Qloquet, MN]]
 +
| accessdate  = 2020-06-29
 +
| url-status  = live     
 +
| quote      = The Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training or POST is collaborating with Minnesota State. In January, POST started to review processes after changes in leadership.
 +
}}
 +
</ref>
 +
 +
<ref name=startribune2020-06-17B>
 +
{{cite news   
 +
| url        = https://www.startribune.com/minnesota-state-colleges-to-review-law-enforcement-training-after-floyd-s-killing/571319522/
 +
| title      = Minnesota State colleges to review law enforcement training in response to George Floyd's killing
 +
| work        = [[Star Tribune]]
 +
| author      = Ryan Faircloth
 +
| date        = 2020-06-17
 +
| archiveurl  = https://web.archive.org/web/20200618025128/https://www.startribune.com/minnesota-state-colleges-to-review-law-enforcement-training-after-floyd-s-killing/571319522/
 +
| archivedate = 2020-06-18
 +
| accessdate  = 2020-06-29
 +
| url-status  = live
 +
| quote      = Minnesota State's police officer programs are certified by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). System law enforcement programs include training on skills such as firearm safety, SWAT, interrogation, crime scene investigation and threat assessment. 
 +
}}
 +
</ref>
 +
 +
<ref name=twincities2020-06-17>
 +
{{cite news   
 +
| url        = https://www.twincities.com/2020/06/17/mn-policing-changes-hamline-professors-legislature/
 +
| title      = Hamline professors: If they want to improve policing in Minnesota, legislators need to know this
 +
| work        = [[Twincities Pioneer Press]]
 +
| author1    = Shelly Schaefer
 +
| author2    = Jillian Peterson
 +
| author3    = Sarah Greenman
 +
| author4    = Gina Erickson
 +
| date        = 2020-06-17
 +
| archiveurl  =
 +
| archivedate =
 +
| accessdate  = 2020-06-29
 +
| url-status  = live
 +
| quote      = Minnesota is one of the few states that requires a post-secondary degree to become a peace officer. Individuals seeking a career in law enforcement can choose to attend one of the 30 Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) accredited education programs. The board certifies that these schools are covering the 410 learning objectives adopted by the MN POST Board.
 +
}}
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</ref>
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<!--
 
<ref name=jeffbackerjr>
 
<ref name=jeffbackerjr>
 
{{cite web
 
{{cite web
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| publisher  = jeffbackerjr.com
 
| publisher  = jeffbackerjr.com
 
| accessdate  = February 17, 2015
 
| accessdate  = February 17, 2015
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| quote      = I have also served as a member of the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training, Browns Valley Lions Club and Browns Valley School District 801. I would describe myself as a commonsense conservative.
 
}}
 
}}
</ref>
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</ref>  -->
  
<ref name=startribune2020-06-17>
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<ref name=startribune2020-06-17A>
 
{{cite news     
 
{{cite news     
 
| url        = https://www.startribune.com/minnesota-licensing-board-to-review-four-ex-officers-roles-in-george-floyd-killing/571300012/
 
| url        = https://www.startribune.com/minnesota-licensing-board-to-review-four-ex-officers-roles-in-george-floyd-killing/571300012/

Revision as of 03:32, 30 June 2020

The Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) is an administrative body of the State of Minnesota, that sets regulations, and controls the training and licensing of Police officers.[1] The Minnesota legislature replaced the Minnesota Peace Officer Training Board (MPOTB) with the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) in 1977.[2]

Colleges and Universities that offer training for Police officers must be certified by the Board.[2] The Board is responsible for the exams candidates must pass before they can serve as Police officers in Minnesota.[3] More than 80 percent of Minnesota's Police officers receive their training through one of colleges or universities in the Minnesota State system.[4]

The May 25, 2020, Killing of George Floyd, by officers of the Minneapolis Police Department, triggered discussion on how to update police training.[3][4][5][6][7]

Derek Chauvin, Tou Thao, Thomas K. Lane and XXX, the four officers with a role in Floyd's killing, were prompty fired, and soon faced criminal charges. They continued to hold licenses to work as police officers.[1] According to the Star Tribune the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) started a review of their licenses to work as police officers until June 17, 2020.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 Greg Stanley (2020-06-17). "Minnesota licensing board to review four ex-officers' roles in George Floyd killing: POST Board has the power to revoke the four former Mpls. cops' licenses.". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on 2020-06-18. https://web.archive.org/web/20200618030832/https://www.startribune.com/minnesota-licensing-board-to-review-four-ex-officers-roles-in-george-floyd-killing/571300012/. Retrieved 2020-06-24. "While all four officers who have been charged in the killing of Floyd were fired from the Minneapolis Police Department, they are still licensed Minnesota peace officers." 
  2. 2.0 2.1 "About the POST Board". Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training. https://dps.mn.gov/entity/post/about/Pages/default.aspx. Retrieved 2020-06-29. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Emma Quinn (2020-06-25). "MN State to review law enforcement training programs". kbjr6 (Qloquet, MN). https://kbjr6.com/2020/06/25/mn-state-to-review-law-enforcement-training-programs/. Retrieved 2020-06-29. "The Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training or POST is collaborating with Minnesota State. In January, POST started to review processes after changes in leadership." 
  4. 4.0 4.1 Ryan Faircloth (2020-06-17). "Minnesota State colleges to review law enforcement training in response to George Floyd's killing". Star Tribune. Archived from the original on 2020-06-18. https://web.archive.org/web/20200618025128/https://www.startribune.com/minnesota-state-colleges-to-review-law-enforcement-training-after-floyd-s-killing/571319522/. Retrieved 2020-06-29. "Minnesota State's police officer programs are certified by the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST). System law enforcement programs include training on skills such as firearm safety, SWAT, interrogation, crime scene investigation and threat assessment." 
  5. Shelly Schaefer; Jillian Peterson; Sarah Greenman; Gina Erickson (2020-06-17). "Hamline professors: If they want to improve policing in Minnesota, legislators need to know this". Twincities Pioneer Press. https://www.twincities.com/2020/06/17/mn-policing-changes-hamline-professors-legislature/. Retrieved 2020-06-29. "Minnesota is one of the few states that requires a post-secondary degree to become a peace officer. Individuals seeking a career in law enforcement can choose to attend one of the 30 Peace Officer Standards and Training (POST) accredited education programs. The board certifies that these schools are covering the 410 learning objectives adopted by the MN POST Board." 
  6. Gina Erickson; Sarah Greenman; Jillian Peterson; Shelly Schaefer (2020-06-02). "Break the cycle: Five changes in Minnesota policing that can be enacted right now". Minnesota Post. https://www.minnpost.com/community-voices/2020/06/break-the-cycle-fives-changes-in-minnesota-policing-that-can-be-enacted-right-now/. Retrieved 2020-06-29. "Officer Chauvin’s previous use of force incidents should have been reviewed by a board that includes citizens, separate from criminal and administrative investigations. This is being done in other cities, to increase transparency and accountability. Domestic Fatality Review teams can be used as a model." 
  7. Brian Lambert (2020-06-25). "Minnesota AG Ellison sues oil companies over climate change". Minnesota Post. https://www.minnpost.com/glean/2020/06/minnesota-ag-ellison-sues-oil-companies-over-climate-change/. Retrieved 2020-06-29. "Erik Misselt, the interim director of the Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training, said the POST board’s policies haven’t kept up with the public’s expectations for police accountability. … Misselt said he’d like to see the POST board go to the state Legislature and ask for changes in state laws to broaden its authority."