Deleted:Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed Al Bihani

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Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani
Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani's Guantanamo identity portrait, showing him wearing the white uniform issued to compliant captives.
Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani's Guantanamo identity portrait, showing him wearing the white uniform issued to compliant captives.
Born 1972
Tabuk, Saudi Arabia
Nationality Yemen
Known for held for over a decade in extrajudicial detention in Guantanamo

Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani is a citizen of Saudi Arabia held in the United States's Guantanamo Bay detention camps, in Cuba.[1] His Guantanamo Internment Serial Number is 893. Joint Task Force Guantanamo analysts report he was born on 1 June 1972, in Tabuk, Saudi Arabia.

Tolfiq Nassar Ahmed al Bihani arrived at Guantanamo on February 7, 2003.

Publication of captives' CSR Tribunal documents

In September 2007 the Department of Justice published dossiers of unclassified documents arising from the Combatant Status Review Tribunals of 179 captives.[2] Toffiq Nassar Ahmed Al Bihani had a writ of habeas corpus filed on his behalf, but the Department of Defense did not publish it with the others.

Military Commissions Act

The Military Commissions Act of 2006 mandated that Guantanamo captives were no longer entitled to access the US civil justice system, so all outstanding habeas corpus petitions were stayed.[3]

Boumediene v. Bush

On June 12, 2008 the United States Supreme Court ruled, in Boumediene v. Bush, that the Military Commissions Act could not remove the right for Guantanamo captives to access the US Federal Court system. And all previous Guantanamo captives' habeas petitions were eligible to be re-instated. The judges considering the captives' habeas petitions would be considering whether the evidence used to compile the allegations the men and boys were enemy combatants justified a classification of "enemy combatant".[4]

Protective order

On 15 July 2008 Kristine A. Huskey filed a "NOTICE OF PETITIONERS’ REQUEST FOR 30-DAYS NOTICE OF TRANSFER" on behalf of Toffiq Nassar Ahmed Al Bihani and several dozen captives.[5] The petition would prevent the Department of Defense from transferring him out of US jurisdiction without giving his attorney's thirty days notice. The Department of Defense had transferred some captives to countries where they were subsequently subjected to abusive treatment—even though they had active habeas corpus petitions.

Habeas timeline

George M. Clarke III swore a declaration on 9 September 2008, stating that Toffiq's brother Adnan Al Bihani, serving as "next friend" initiated the habeas corpus process, in a letter dated 17 June 2005.[6] Clarke and other attorneys formally filed the petition on 14 December 2005. Toffiq had initially declined to sign a form authoring Clarke to serve as his counsel in 2005. But when Clarke was able to meet with him on 28 March 2007 Toffiq verbally authorized him to serve as his counsel, and he followed up that verbal authorization with a letter authorizing him to serve as counsel.

See also

Reports his brother was killed fighting in Somalia

The Long War Journal reported that a martyrship video from Abu 'Asim al Tabuki Mansour Nasser al Bihani was published in November 2011.[7] It reported that this individual had fought in Chechnya, lived in Afghanistan, until the fall of the Taliban, had been captured in Saudi Arabia, transferred to Yemen, where he escaped from Prison, and finally travelled to Somalia, where he died fighting for jihadists. It reported he had two brothers in Guantanamo.

References

  1. "List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006". United States Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/news/May2006/d20060515%20List.pdf. Retrieved 2006-05-15.  16x16px Works related to List of Individuals Detained by the Department of Defense at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba from January 2002 through May 15, 2006 at Wikisource
  2. OARDEC0 (August 8, 2007). "Index for CSRT Records Publicly Files in Guantanamo Detainee Cases". United States Department of Defense. http://www.dod.mil/pubs/foi/detainees/csrt_arb/index_publicly_filed_CSRT_records.pdf. Retrieved 2007-09-29. 
  3. Peter D. Keisler, Douglas N. Letter (2006-10-16). "NOTICE OF MILITARY COMMISSIONS ACT OF 2006". United States Department of Justice. http://natseclaw.typepad.com/natseclaw/files/Hamdan.28j.letter.pdf. Retrieved 2008-09-30.  mirror
  4. Farah Stockman (2008-10-24). "Lawyers debate 'enemy combatant'". Boston Globe. http://www.boston.com/news/nation/washington/articles/2008/10/24/lawyers_debate_enemy_combatant/. Retrieved 2008-10-24.  mirror
  5. Kristine A. Huskey (2008-07-15). "Guantanamo Bay Detainee Litigation: Doc 63 -- NOTICE OF PETITIONERS’ REQUEST FOR 30-DAYS NOTICE OF TRANSFER". United States Department of Justice. http://docs.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/district-of-columbia/dcdce/1:2008mc00442/131990/63/0.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-13.  mirror
  6. George M. Clarke III (2008-09-09). "Guantanamo Bay Detainee Litigation: Doc 402 -- Declaration of George M. Clarke III". United States Department of Justice. http://docs.justia.com/cases/federal/district-courts/district-of-columbia/dcdce/1:2008mc00442/131990/402/0.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-13.  mirror
  7. Bill Roggio (2011-12-10). "Jihadist releases bio of Yemeni al Qaeda operative killed in Somalia". Long War Journal. http://www.longwarjournal.org/archives/2011/12/yemeni_al_qaeda_oper_1.php. Retrieved 2011-12-14. "The statement announcing the death of Abu 'Asim al Tabuki Mansour Nasser al Bihani was written by Abu Ibrahim al Muhajir and released on Shumukh al Islam, a jihadist forum closely linked to al Qaeda, on Nov. 26." 

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